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Jimmy Carter in Plains ga. On assignment for Associated press

I made my way down to Plains, Georgia to see former President Jimmy Carter teach Sunday School class at Maranatha Baptist Church.  He announced on Dec. 6 that his doctors told him there was no evidence of cancer in his brain.  Sadly, after this victory, Carter announced just two weeks later that his 28-year-old grandson Jeremy Carter passed away in his sleep.  Here is a photo essay of my time in Plains, Georgia.

Former President Jimmy Carter prays during Sunday School class at Maranatha Baptist Church in his hometown, Sunday, Dec. 13, 2015, in Plains, Ga. A recent MRI showing no cancer on Jimmy Carter's brain is "very positive" news for the former president but will not end his medical treatment, doctors said. Carter, 91, announced on Dec. 6 that doctors found no evidence of the four lesions discovered on his brain this summer and no signs of new cancer growth. (AP Photo/Branden Camp)

Former President Jimmy Carter prays during Sunday School class at Maranatha Baptist Church in his hometown, Sunday, Dec. 13, 2015, in Plains, Ga. A recent MRI showing no cancer on Jimmy Carter's brain is "very positive" news for the former president but will not end his medical treatment, doctors said. Carter, 91, announced on Dec. 6 that doctors found no evidence of the four lesions discovered on his brain this summer and no signs of new cancer growth. (AP Photo/Branden Camp)

People line up to see former President Jimmy Carter teach Sunday School class at Maranatha Baptist Church in his hometown, Sunday, Dec. 13, 2015, in Plains, Ga. A recent MRI showing no cancer on Jimmy Carter's brain is "very positive" news for the former president but will not end his medical treatment, doctors said. Carter, 91, announced on Dec. 6 that doctors found no evidence of the four lesions discovered on his brain this summer and no signs of new cancer growth. (AP Photo/Branden Camp)

People line up to see former President Jimmy Carter teach Sunday School class at Maranatha Baptist Church in his hometown, Sunday, Dec. 13, 2015, in Plains, Ga. A recent MRI showing no cancer on Jimmy Carter's brain is "very positive" news for the former president but will not end his medical treatment, doctors said. Carter, 91, announced on Dec. 6 that doctors found no evidence of the four lesions discovered on his brain this summer and no signs of new cancer growth. (AP Photo/Branden Camp)

Jan Williams shows guests an offering plate that former President Jimmy Carter made before he teaches Sunday School class at Maranatha Baptist Church in his hometown, Sunday, Dec. 13, 2015, in Plains, Ga.  A recent MRI showing no cancer on Jimmy Carter's brain is "very positive" news for the former president but will not end his medical treatment, doctors said. Carter, 91, announced on Dec. 6 that doctors found no evidence of the four lesions discovered on his brain this summer and no signs of new cancer growth. (AP Photo/Branden Camp)

Jan Williams shows guests an offering plate that former President Jimmy Carter made before he teaches Sunday School class at Maranatha Baptist Church in his hometown, Sunday, Dec. 13, 2015, in Plains, Ga.  A recent MRI showing no cancer on Jimmy Carter's brain is "very positive" news for the former president but will not end his medical treatment, doctors said. Carter, 91, announced on Dec. 6 that doctors found no evidence of the four lesions discovered on his brain this summer and no signs of new cancer growth. (AP Photo/Branden Camp)

Church member Warren Chancey listens as former President Jimmy Carter teaches during Sunday School class at Maranatha Baptist Church in his hometown, Sunday, Dec. 13, 2015, in Plains, Ga. A recent MRI showing no cancer on Jimmy Carter's brain is "very positive" news for the former president but will not end his medical treatment, doctors said. Carter, 91, announced on Dec. 6 that doctors found no evidence of the four lesions discovered on his brain this summer and no signs of new cancer growth. (AP Photo/Branden Camp)

Church member Warren Chancey listens as former President Jimmy Carter teaches during Sunday School class at Maranatha Baptist Church in his hometown, Sunday, Dec. 13, 2015, in Plains, Ga. A recent MRI showing no cancer on Jimmy Carter's brain is "very positive" news for the former president but will not end his medical treatment, doctors said. Carter, 91, announced on Dec. 6 that doctors found no evidence of the four lesions discovered on his brain this summer and no signs of new cancer growth. (AP Photo/Branden Camp)

Former President Jimmy Carter teaches during Sunday School class at Maranatha Baptist Church in his hometown, Sunday, Dec. 13, 2015, in Plains, Ga. A recent MRI showing no cancer on Jimmy Carter's brain is "very positive" news for the former president but will not end his medical treatment, doctors said. Carter, 91, announced Dec. 6 that doctors found no evidence of the four lesions discovered on his brain this summer and no signs of new cancer growth. (AP Photo/Branden Camp)

Former President Jimmy Carter teaches during Sunday School class at Maranatha Baptist Church in his hometown, Sunday, Dec. 13, 2015, in Plains, Ga. A recent MRI showing no cancer on Jimmy Carter's brain is "very positive" news for the former president but will not end his medical treatment, doctors said. Carter, 91, announced Dec. 6 that doctors found no evidence of the four lesions discovered on his brain this summer and no signs of new cancer growth. (AP Photo/Branden Camp)

Former President Jimmy Carter, right, sits with his wife, Rosalynn, as they wait to pose for photos with guests at Maranatha Baptist Church, Sunday, Dec. 13, 2015, in Plains, Ga. A recent MRI showing no cancer on Jimmy Carter's brain is "very positive" news for the former president but will not end his medical treatment, doctors said. Carter, 91, announced on Dec. 6 that doctors found no evidence of the four lesions discovered on his brain this summer and no signs of new cancer growth. (AP Photo/Branden Camp)

Former President Jimmy Carter, right, sits with his wife, Rosalynn, as they wait to pose for photos with guests at Maranatha Baptist Church, Sunday, Dec. 13, 2015, in Plains, Ga. A recent MRI showing no cancer on Jimmy Carter's brain is "very positive" news for the former president but will not end his medical treatment, doctors said. Carter, 91, announced on Dec. 6 that doctors found no evidence of the four lesions discovered on his brain this summer and no signs of new cancer growth. (AP Photo/Branden Camp)

A church member cleans up the sanctuary after former President Jimmy Carter taught Sunday School class at Maranatha Baptist Church in his hometown, Sunday, Dec. 13, 2015, in Plains, Ga. A recent MRI showing no cancer on Jimmy Carter's brain is "very positive" news for the former president but will not end his medical treatment, doctors said. Carter, 91, announced on Dec. 6 that doctors found no evidence of the four lesions discovered on his brain this summer and no signs of new cancer growth. (AP Photo/Branden Camp)

A church member cleans up the sanctuary after former President Jimmy Carter taught Sunday School class at Maranatha Baptist Church in his hometown, Sunday, Dec. 13, 2015, in Plains, Ga. A recent MRI showing no cancer on Jimmy Carter's brain is "very positive" news for the former president but will not end his medical treatment, doctors said. Carter, 91, announced on Dec. 6 that doctors found no evidence of the four lesions discovered on his brain this summer and no signs of new cancer growth. (AP Photo/Branden Camp)

A man leaves after hearing former President Jimmy Carter teach Sunday School class at Maranatha Baptist Church in his hometown, Sunday, Dec. 13, 2015, in Plains, Ga. A recent MRI showing no cancer on Jimmy Carter's brain is "very positive" news for the former president but will not end his medical treatment, doctors said. Carter, 91, announced on Dec. 6 that doctors found no evidence of the four lesions discovered on his brain this summer and no signs of new cancer growth. (AP Photo/Branden Camp)

A man leaves after hearing former President Jimmy Carter teach Sunday School class at Maranatha Baptist Church in his hometown, Sunday, Dec. 13, 2015, in Plains, Ga. A recent MRI showing no cancer on Jimmy Carter's brain is "very positive" news for the former president but will not end his medical treatment, doctors said. Carter, 91, announced on Dec. 6 that doctors found no evidence of the four lesions discovered on his brain this summer and no signs of new cancer growth. (AP Photo/Branden Camp)

Former President Jimmy Carter walks with his wife Rosalynn after teaching Sunday School class at Maranatha Baptist Church Sunday, Dec. 13, 2015, in Plains, Ga. A recent MRI showing no cancer on Jimmy Carter's brain is "very positive" news for the former president but will not end his medical treatment, doctors said. Carter, 91, announced Dec. 6 that doctors found no evidence of the four lesions discovered on his brain this summer and no signs of new cancer growth. (AP Photo/Branden Camp)

Former President Jimmy Carter walks with his wife Rosalynn after teaching Sunday School class at Maranatha Baptist Church Sunday, Dec. 13, 2015, in Plains, Ga. A recent MRI showing no cancer on Jimmy Carter's brain is "very positive" news for the former president but will not end his medical treatment, doctors said. Carter, 91, announced Dec. 6 that doctors found no evidence of the four lesions discovered on his brain this summer and no signs of new cancer growth. (AP Photo/Branden Camp)

People visit the old Plains High School where former President Jimmy Carter attended, Sunday, Dec. 13, 2015, in Plains, Ga. A recent MRI showing no cancer on Jimmy Carter's brain is "very positive" news for the former president but will not end his medical treatment, doctors said. Carter, 91, announced Dec. 6 that doctors found no evidence of the four lesions discovered on his brain this summer and no signs of new cancer growth. (AP Photo/Branden Camp)

People visit the old Plains High School where former President Jimmy Carter attended, Sunday, Dec. 13, 2015, in Plains, Ga. A recent MRI showing no cancer on Jimmy Carter's brain is "very positive" news for the former president but will not end his medical treatment, doctors said. Carter, 91, announced Dec. 6 that doctors found no evidence of the four lesions discovered on his brain this summer and no signs of new cancer growth. (AP Photo/Branden Camp)

A view of downtown Plains, Ga., Sunday, Dec. 13, 2015.  A recent MRI showing no cancer on Jimmy Carter's brain is "very positive" news for the former president but will not end his medical treatment, doctors said. Carter, 91, announced Dec. 6 that doctors found no evidence of the four lesions discovered on his brain this summer and no signs of new cancer growth. (AP Photo/Branden Camp)

A view of downtown Plains, Ga., Sunday, Dec. 13, 2015.  A recent MRI showing no cancer on Jimmy Carter's brain is "very positive" news for the former president but will not end his medical treatment, doctors said. Carter, 91, announced Dec. 6 that doctors found no evidence of the four lesions discovered on his brain this summer and no signs of new cancer growth. (AP Photo/Branden Camp)

A woman walks through downtown Plains, Ga., Sunday, Dec. 13, 2015.  A recent MRI showing no cancer on Jimmy Carter's brain is "very positive" news for the former president but will not end his medical treatment, doctors said. Carter, 91, announced Dec. 6 that doctors found no evidence of the four lesions discovered on his brain this summer and no signs of new cancer growth. (AP Photo/Branden Camp)

A woman walks through downtown Plains, Ga., Sunday, Dec. 13, 2015.  A recent MRI showing no cancer on Jimmy Carter's brain is "very positive" news for the former president but will not end his medical treatment, doctors said. Carter, 91, announced Dec. 6 that doctors found no evidence of the four lesions discovered on his brain this summer and no signs of new cancer growth. (AP Photo/Branden Camp)

A man walks through former President Jimmy Carters' campaign headquarters in downtown Plains, Ga., Sunday, Dec. 13, 2015.  A recent MRI showing no cancer on Jimmy Carter's brain is "very positive" news for the former president but will not end his medical treatment, doctors said. Carter, 91, announced Dec. 6 that doctors found no evidence of the four lesions discovered on his brain this summer and no signs of new cancer growth. (AP Photo/Branden Camp)

A man walks through former President Jimmy Carters' campaign headquarters in downtown Plains, Ga., Sunday, Dec. 13, 2015.  A recent MRI showing no cancer on Jimmy Carter's brain is "very positive" news for the former president but will not end his medical treatment, doctors said. Carter, 91, announced Dec. 6 that doctors found no evidence of the four lesions discovered on his brain this summer and no signs of new cancer growth. (AP Photo/Branden Camp)

A man walks through former President Jimmy Carters' campaign headquarters in downtown Plains, Ga., Sunday, Dec. 13, 2015.  A recent MRI showing no cancer on Jimmy Carter's brain is "very positive" news for the former president but will not end his medical treatment, doctors said. Carter, 91, announced Dec. 6 that doctors found no evidence of the four lesions discovered on his brain this summer and no signs of new cancer growth. (AP Photo/Branden Camp)

A man walks through former President Jimmy Carters' campaign headquarters in downtown Plains, Ga., Sunday, Dec. 13, 2015.  A recent MRI showing no cancer on Jimmy Carter's brain is "very positive" news for the former president but will not end his medical treatment, doctors said. Carter, 91, announced Dec. 6 that doctors found no evidence of the four lesions discovered on his brain this summer and no signs of new cancer growth. (AP Photo/Branden Camp)